Training Attention with Neurotracker: A classroom-based approach

Updated: May 12

The research will set out to further the knowledge on whether NeuroTracker can be used in a classroom setting to improve attention. Furthermore, as a secondary objective, the proposed research will set out to explore whether the improvement in attention can also translate to an improvement in academics.


Principal Investigator (PI): Domenico Tullo

Institution & Department: McGill University – Department of Educational and Counselling

Psychology

Supervisor: Dr. Armando Bertone

Year(s) collaborated with SCERT on project: 2017 - 2018

 

Results of Research Project:


Assessing the feasibility of a classroom-based visual attention training program targeting academics for students with extremely low IQ

Catherine Archambault, Domenico Tullo, Emma Clark, Jocelyn Faubert, Armando Bertone (2021)


Abstract:

This feasibility study investigated the viability of implementing a cognitive-based training program (NeuroTracker) and assessing its potential effects on academic performance for adolescents with extremely low IQ. Methods: Twenty-six adolescents aged between 11 and 16 years with a Wechsler-based IQs in the extremely low range (MIQ = 56.00, SDIQ = 13.89) completed 15 training sessions on either the NeuroTracker or an active control task; math and reading performance were assessed using clinically validated instruments before and after training. Recruitment and retention rates, adherence, and properties of the academic measures were assessed. Results: All recruited participants completed 15 training sessions within a 6-week period. Eighty-three percent of participants meeting initial inclusion criteria completed all stages of the study from baseline to post-intervention assessments. Some limitations of the academic measures were identified. Conclusions: Results suggest that implementing NeuroTracker as a classroom-based intervention and using clinically validated outcome measures is feasible with this population.


Link to full article (open access):

https://pilotfeasibilitystudies.biomedcentral.com/track/pdf/10.1186/s40814-021-00879-z.pdf

Archambault, C., Tullo, D., Clark, E. et al. Assessing the feasibility of a classroom-based visual attention training program targeting academics for students with extremely low IQ. Pilot Feasibility Stud7, 150 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1186/s40814-021-00879-z

 


Training with a three-dimensional multiple object-tracking (3D-MOT) paradigm improves attention in students with a neurodevelopmental condition: a randomized controlled trial.

Domenico Tullo, Jacalyn Guy, Jocelyn Faubert, Armando Bertone (2018)


Abstract: The efficacy of attention training paradigms is influenced by many factors, including the specificity of targeted cognitive processes, accuracy of outcome measures, accessibility to specialized populations, and adaptability to user capability. These issues are increasingly significant when working with children diagnosed with neurodevelopmental conditions that are characterized by attentional difficulties. This study investigated the efficacy of training attention in students with neurodevelopmental conditions using a novel three-dimensional Multiple Object-Tracking (3D-MOT) task. All students (ages 6–18 years) performed the Conners Continuous Performance Task (CPT-3) as a baseline measure of attention. They were then equally and randomly assigned to one of three groups: a treatment group, (3D-MOT); an active control group (visual strategy/math-based game, 2048); and a treatment as usual group. Students were trained on their respective tasks for a total of 15 training sessions over a five-week period and then reassessed on the CPT-3. Results showed that post-training CPT-3 performance significantly improved from baseline for participants in the treatment group only. This improvement indicates that training with 3D-MOT increased attentional abilities in students with neurodevelopmental conditions. These results suggest that training attention with a non-verbal, visual-based task is feasible in a school setting and accessible to atypically developing students with attentional difficulties.


Link to article: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/desc.12670


Tullo, D, Guy, J, Faubert, J, Bertone, A. Training with a three-dimensional multiple object-tracking (3D-MOT) paradigm improves attention in students with a neurodevelopmental condition: a randomized controlled trial. Dev Sci. 2018; 21:e12670. https://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12670